The development of a landscape painting

This is a fairly common theme for me – to share progress photos of paintings. I like people to see that a painting does not just come about in a few sittings, but often can undergo a complete transformation from its beginnings. I am guilty of getting attached to areas of paintings and not wanting to paint over them. But sometimes you just have to let that all go in the pursuit of something more. For it is only through the layering of the paint that I believe you can tell a full story. So here is the story of this one. I brought this piece in to art class at a stage where I thought it was close to finishing. And by becoming less attached and less precious with it I was able to explore completely new territory. I referenced the great Idris Murphy for this piece, both in my colour choice and in the banding of the landscape, as is typical of his compositions.

Early stages. Background and shapes on top of it.

Early stages. Background and shapes on top of it.

Early stages. Lots of loose brushwork and more colours.

Early stages. Lots of loose brushwork and more colours.

Introducing more colour and a few more shapes which makes it almost a bit too busy.

Introducing more colour and a few more shapes which makes it almost a bit too busy.

I attempt to put in a blue "sky" but feel it doesn't work and so I take it out again.

I attempt to put in a blue "sky" but feel it doesn't work and so I take it out again.

I take out the sky add in some greenery. Increase the earthy tones.

I take out the sky add in some greenery. Increase the earthy tones.

Now I try to experiment with creating a single shape but it's too bold a move and so I just keep going

Now I try to experiment with creating a single shape but it's too bold a move and so I just keep going

I start to pull out some larger shapes and knock back the rest and it all starts to get quite dark

I start to pull out some larger shapes and knock back the rest and it all starts to get quite dark

I introduce some green and start to love the top right hand corner...

I introduce some green and start to love the top right hand corner...

Now I flip it upside down which is an essential part of my process!

Now I flip it upside down which is an essential part of my process!

And then I go radical. My teacher encourages me to just obliterate it all and stop holding on and being precious. So I DO IT! And I quite like it.... But not the big contrasting shape. Its too much...

And then I go radical. My teacher encourages me to just obliterate it all and stop holding on and being precious. So I DO IT! And I quite like it.... But not the big contrasting shape. Its too much...

So I flip it upside down again.

So I flip it upside down again.

And back up again and change that big contrasting shape. I start to bring in some dappled elements from the view of the trees from my studio. I put in more shapes.

And back up again and change that big contrasting shape. I start to bring in some dappled elements from the view of the trees from my studio. I put in more shapes.

Then I sand areas back. And I keep pushing and playing and taking away until....

Then I sand areas back. And I keep pushing and playing and taking away until....

I get here. And I stop. It is ambiguous enough to be interesting yet still definitely a landscape. It represents the red earth of the land here in Newybar and the space I have around me in my new home. I have called it For Always because after moving 25 times I will not move again. This is my home.

I get here. And I stop. It is ambiguous enough to be interesting yet still definitely a landscape. It represents the red earth of the land here in Newybar and the space I have around me in my new home. I have called it For Always because after moving 25 times I will not move again. This is my home.

New Art Prints in store and online

I am continually updating my print range to try and provide a cross section of work that can bring the right colour combination and feeling into your living space. Original art is a big investment to make which is why choosing a high quality print created on archival paper with archival inks is often a great and affordable option.

Here a some of the latest additions to the print range which you can buy online here. Free shipping Australia wide.

Minted 56 x 56cm. Shop here.

Minted 56 x 56cm. Shop here.

Blossom 30x30cm, 56x56cm, 92x92cm. Shop here.

Blossom 30x30cm, 56x56cm, 92x92cm. Shop here.

Green Line 30x30cm. Shop here.

Green Line 30x30cm. Shop here.

Faraway 30x30cm. Shop here.

Faraway 30x30cm. Shop here.

Flit 30x30cm. Shop here.

Flit 30x30cm. Shop here.

Island Hopper 30x30cm, 56x64cm. Shop here.

Island Hopper 30x30cm, 56x64cm. Shop here.

Reconnaisance 30x30cm, 56x72cm. Shop here.

Reconnaisance 30x30cm, 56x72cm. Shop here.

Rebirthing a painting

Sometimes you'll paint something and you think you are okay with it. You kinda like it. It's good. You've spent a lot of time on it. So much paint, so many layers.

You sit with it a while. A few weeks even. And then you start to fall out of like with it until you find it actually starts to irritate and aggravate you the more you look at it. Or you nit pick it to death and find all its faults and realise....  its time for a rebirth! 

And oftentimes this process of the rebirth will bring about something totally unique and opposite to what went before. Well, this is the case with this painting anyway... And the painting that went before adds depth, dimension and information to the piece. It only ever adds I believe.

On the left is a fully completed painting that even went to a gallery (and didn't sell) and on the right is it rebirthed (it sold within a day)

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So here is the process...

This is my starting image: a fully realised painting. That I didn't like.

This is my starting image: a fully realised painting. That I didn't like.

I'm probably missing a progress shot between the first image and this one. I am guessing its cos I just went ape with the paint to try and cover over the reds as quickly as possible before realising I hadn't taken a photo!

I'm probably missing a progress shot between the first image and this one. I am guessing its cos I just went ape with the paint to try and cover over the reds as quickly as possible before realising I hadn't taken a photo!

Here I start to lighten the darks up a fair bit...

Here I start to lighten the darks up a fair bit...

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I introduce some teals and refine the shapes a bit...

I introduce some teals and refine the shapes a bit...

Then I slope the horizon line down a bit... 

Then I slope the horizon line down a bit... 

I decide the teal is not working and I cover it over and introduce some browns and more neutral tones

I decide the teal is not working and I cover it over and introduce some browns and more neutral tones

A big blob of white emerges and I start to simplify the shapes

A big blob of white emerges and I start to simplify the shapes

And then we get a pop of pink and rust from out of nowhere!

And then we get a pop of pink and rust from out of nowhere!

I use my favourite trick of turning the painting upside and she's almost there...

I use my favourite trick of turning the painting upside and she's almost there...

The finished piece. Plenty of texture (lots of sanding back was done). It was certainly a process. But worth it I feel!

The finished piece. Plenty of texture (lots of sanding back was done). It was certainly a process. But worth it I feel!

If you love this painting  you can buy the print on my online store here.

If you love this painting  you can buy the print on my online store here.

How "Life is an Adventure" metamorphosised

This painting was completed for my solo show in 2014

Quite often I will complete a work and then after sitting it with a while decide it is totally not up to scratch and I will cover it over completely until something else emerges. This particular piece "Life is an Adventure" was voted the "most popular" piece at my second solo show in 2014. The jungle and green depict the landscape and different avenues, opportunities, hardships and twists and turns that life can bring us. The gold leaves represent the hidden treasures that are planted along the way, which we uncover just at the right moment, to send us a message and give us hope.

The starting image. A painting which I had previously thought was complete. It wasnt!

The starting image. A painting which I had previously thought was complete. It wasnt!

Here I start to introduce the gold...

Here I start to introduce the gold...

At this stage I flip the canvas upside down to get a new perspective... (this is something I do A LOT!)

At this stage I flip the canvas upside down to get a new perspective... (this is something I do A LOT!)

I start to create the "jungle" and then I flip it back around again...

I start to create the "jungle" and then I flip it back around again...

I flip it around yet again and keep expanding the "jungle"

I flip it around yet again and keep expanding the "jungle"

And here it is pretty much done!

And here it is pretty much done!

Me with the completed piece when I was living in my little rental in Graceville in Brisbane 2015

Me with the completed piece when I was living in my little rental in Graceville in Brisbane 2015

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This has been a much loved piece and is available as a print in a number of sizes from my website here.